The Cure for the Common Trip
  • Founded in 1973, Moon was one of the first advocates of independent travel. We are published by Avalon Travel, an imprint of the Perseus Books Group.
Ghostly Overnights in Dallas
If you’re one of that strange breed who loves a case of the paranormal shivers, look no further than the Hotel Lawrence for accommodations in Dallas. The hotel was built in 1925, and while it now serves as an affordable boutique hotel, it has a deliciously creepy pedigree.
For one thing, the basement once held a seedy underbelly of illegal gambling (many ghost hunters there today use poker chips to tempt the possible spirits to make themselves known). Hotel employees to this day report strange goings-on in the former casino—laundry baskets moving themselves, lights going on and off, electrical devices ceasing to work.
Read the full article on Moon.com. 
Photo in the public domain.

Ghostly Overnights in Dallas

If you’re one of that strange breed who loves a case of the paranormal shivers, look no further than the Hotel Lawrence for accommodations in Dallas. The hotel was built in 1925, and while it now serves as an affordable boutique hotel, it has a deliciously creepy pedigree.

For one thing, the basement once held a seedy underbelly of illegal gambling (many ghost hunters there today use poker chips to tempt the possible spirits to make themselves known). Hotel employees to this day report strange goings-on in the former casino—laundry baskets moving themselves, lights going on and off, electrical devices ceasing to work.

Read the full article on Moon.com. 

Photo in the public domain.

Various environmental organizations collaborate with the Mexican government to protect sea turtles and their habitats; they maintain strict surveillance of known nesting beaches to stop poaching and have developed breeding programs, too. This, in combination with laws that prohibit the capture and trade of sea turtles or their products, has tremendously increased awareness about their protection.
On Isla Cozumel, travelers can volunteer to monitor nests and to release hatchlings into the sea. Nesting season runs May-September, and during that period volunteers join biologists on nighttime walks of Cozumel’s beaches, locating and marking new nests, and moving vulnerable eggs to protected hatcheries. From July to November, volunteers release hatchings, typically at sundown, by encouraging the tiny turtles to move toward the water (without touching them) and scaring off birds in search of an easy meal.
Read the full article: "Sea Turtles of the Yucatán"
Photo © Kevin T., licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

Various environmental organizations collaborate with the Mexican government to protect sea turtles and their habitats; they maintain strict surveillance of known nesting beaches to stop poaching and have developed breeding programs, too. This, in combination with laws that prohibit the capture and trade of sea turtles or their products, has tremendously increased awareness about their protection.

On Isla Cozumel, travelers can volunteer to monitor nests and to release hatchlings into the sea. Nesting season runs May-September, and during that period volunteers join biologists on nighttime walks of Cozumel’s beaches, locating and marking new nests, and moving vulnerable eggs to protected hatcheries. From July to November, volunteers release hatchings, typically at sundown, by encouraging the tiny turtles to move toward the water (without touching them) and scaring off birds in search of an easy meal.

Read the full article: "Sea Turtles of the Yucatán"

Photo © Kevin T., licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

Reblogged from atlasobscura  2,111 notes

atlasobscura:

The Sunken City of Baia - Baia, Italy

In its heyday, the Classical Roman city of Baia was the hedonist Las Vegas of the time, but now its remains are partying beneath the waves.

A prominent resort city for centuries, Baia catered to the recreational whims of the rich and powerful among the Roman elite. The city, which was located over natural volcanic vents, was famous for its healing medicinal hot springs which occurred all around the city and were quite easy to build spas over. Some of antiquity’s most powerful figures such as Nero, Cicero, and Caesar were known to have visited the city and a number of them actually built permanent vacation villas there.

Unfortunately the good times were not to last and the city was sacked by Saracens in the 8th century and by 1500, the remains of the formerly luxurious town were abandoned. After the city remains were emptied, the water level slowly rose due to the same volcanic vents that were once a draw to the area, and most of the ancient ruins were drowned under the shallow waters of the bay.

Today the ancient remains of Baia can be visited in one of the world’s few underwater archeological parks.

Plan a visit to The Sunken City of Baia on Atlas Obscura!