The Cure for the Common Trip
  • Founded in 1973, Moon was one of the first advocates of independent travel. We are published by Avalon Travel, an imprint of the Perseus Books Group.


When to Go to Hawai’i



The biggest seasonal difference is the surf. North shores see higher waves in winter (October through March), which produce world class surf breaks. The opposite is true during summer (May through September) when the south shore surf rises, although it’s still gentler for beginners.Excerpted from Moon Hawaiian Islands, by Kevin Whitton.Photo © Aaron Najera, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.
When to Go to Hawai’i

The biggest seasonal difference is the surf. North shores see higher waves in winter (October through March), which produce world class surf breaks. The opposite is true during summer (May through September) when the south shore surf rises, although it’s still gentler for beginners.
Excerpted from Moon Hawaiian Islands, by Kevin Whitton.

Photo © Aaron Najera, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.
(via 2014 Pride Events around the World)

Tel Aviv, Israel: June 8–14
Tel Aviv, one of the most progressive cities in Israel, is the gay capital of the Middle East. Its weeklong Pride festival is filled with events celebrating the LGBTQ community. The festival culminates in a parade on June 13, which begins at Meir Park and moves toward the Charles Clore Beach and Park. The area is gorgeous, peaceful, and relatively isolated, but it transforms on the day of the parade. The party following the parade is full of thousands of people dancing on the beach until sunset. As the weather in Tel Aviv in June is very hot, almost everyone jumps into the Mediterranean Sea to cool off.
Barcelona, Spain: June 19–29
If you want to experience the Mediterranean coast of Spain, spend a week in Barcelona, Catalan’s capital and Spain’s most cosmopolitan city, and experience the Catalan LGBTQ scene. Pride Barcelona is very new and much smaller compared to MADO in Madrid, but it is growing rapidly each year.
The entire week will be filled with free events. On Friday, June 27, there will be the Miss Drag Pride race, and in the evening everyone will be soaking in the biggest outdoor foam party in Europe. On Saturday, June 28, the parade will wind through the colorful architecture of Barcelona and will transform into a huge party. The weekend will finish off on Sunday, June 29, with a street party filled with food and drink stands, and for amusement park fans, the Tibidabo Amusement Park will be discounted for the day. Tired after this crazy weekend? Relax and recuperate on the beach by the Mediterranean Sea.

Read more.
Photo © Antonio Tajuelo, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

(via 2014 Pride Events around the World)

Tel Aviv, Israel: June 8–14

Tel Aviv, one of the most progressive cities in Israel, is the gay capital of the Middle East. Its weeklong Pride festival is filled with events celebrating the LGBTQ community. The festival culminates in a parade on June 13, which begins at Meir Park and moves toward the Charles Clore Beach and Park. The area is gorgeous, peaceful, and relatively isolated, but it transforms on the day of the parade. The party following the parade is full of thousands of people dancing on the beach until sunset. As the weather in Tel Aviv in June is very hot, almost everyone jumps into the Mediterranean Sea to cool off.

Barcelona, Spain: June 19–29

If you want to experience the Mediterranean coast of Spain, spend a week in Barcelona, Catalan’s capital and Spain’s most cosmopolitan city, and experience the Catalan LGBTQ scene. Pride Barcelona is very new and much smaller compared to MADO in Madrid, but it is growing rapidly each year.

The entire week will be filled with free events. On Friday, June 27, there will be the Miss Drag Pride race, and in the evening everyone will be soaking in the biggest outdoor foam party in Europe. On Saturday, June 28, the parade will wind through the colorful architecture of Barcelona and will transform into a huge party. The weekend will finish off on Sunday, June 29, with a street party filled with food and drink stands, and for amusement park fans, the Tibidabo Amusement Park will be discounted for the day. Tired after this crazy weekend? Relax and recuperate on the beach by the Mediterranean Sea.

Read more.

Photo © Antonio Tajuelo, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

(via Exploring the Ruins of Copán)

The ruins of Copán are about a kilometer east of Copán Ruinas on the road toward San Pedro Sula, set off the road in a six-hectare wooded archaeological park along the edge of the Río Copán. After buying your US$15 entrance ticket, walk up the path from the visitors center through tall trees to the entrance gate, where a guard will take your ticket. If you’d like to enter the archaeological tunnels, buy an additional ticket for US$15 (a high price for the experience, recommended for archaeology buffs only). (Tickets for the adjacent Museo de Escultura Maya are also sold at the visitors center, US$7 and highly recommended.)

Much of the original sculpture work at Copán has been removed from the grounds and replaced by exact duplicates. Although this is a bit disappointing for visitors, it is essential if the city’s artistic legacy is not to be lost forever, worn away by the elements and thousands of curious hands. Most of the finest stelae and carvings can now be seen in the Museo de Escultura Maya.
Just before the place where the guards check your ticket is a kilometer-long nature trail with examples of ceiba, strangler fig, and other plants characteristic of the jungle that originally covered the Valle de Copán, worth taking a brief stroll along either before or after visiting the ruins.

Read more.
Photo © Vojtech Vlk/123rf.

(via Exploring the Ruins of Copán)

The ruins of Copán are about a kilometer east of Copán Ruinas on the road toward San Pedro Sula, set off the road in a six-hectare wooded archaeological park along the edge of the Río Copán. After buying your US$15 entrance ticket, walk up the path from the visitors center through tall trees to the entrance gate, where a guard will take your ticket. If you’d like to enter the archaeological tunnels, buy an additional ticket for US$15 (a high price for the experience, recommended for archaeology buffs only). (Tickets for the adjacent Museo de Escultura Maya are also sold at the visitors center, US$7 and highly recommended.)

Much of the original sculpture work at Copán has been removed from the grounds and replaced by exact duplicates. Although this is a bit disappointing for visitors, it is essential if the city’s artistic legacy is not to be lost forever, worn away by the elements and thousands of curious hands. Most of the finest stelae and carvings can now be seen in the Museo de Escultura Maya.

Just before the place where the guards check your ticket is a kilometer-long nature trail with examples of ceiba, strangler fig, and other plants characteristic of the jungle that originally covered the Valle de Copán, worth taking a brief stroll along either before or after visiting the ruins.

Read more.

Photo © Vojtech Vlk/123rf.

(via Visiting the Island of Utila)

Utila feels lost in a tropical time warp. Listening to the broad, almost incomprehensible Caribbean English coming out of islanders with names like Morgan and Bodden, it seems pirates ran amok here just a few years back instead of three centuries ago. Life on Utila still moves at a sedate pace; local conversation (imbued with an island lilt) is dominated by the weather, the state of the fishing industry, and spicy gossip about the affairs of the 2,800 or so inhabitants.
In the past couple of decades, Utila has gradually come face to face with the modern day. A steadily growing stream of budget travelers flow in from across the globe, all eager to get scuba certification for as little money as possible (about US$300 in early 2012, including dorm-style accommodations) and to enjoy the balmy Caribbean waters and famed reef. With its semiofficial designation as the low-budget Bay Island, Utila has become one of those backpacker hot spots like Zipolite or Lake Atitlán—packed with young Europeans and Americans out for a good time in the sun. Utila is also well known among sea-life enthusiasts as one of the best places in the world to see the whale shark, the largest fish in the world. These monstrous creatures, getting as big as 15 meters, frequent the Cayman Channel right off Utila and can be spotted (with much patience and a good captain) frequently throughout the year, and particularly in April, May, August, and September.

Read more.
Photo © Keith Levit/123rf.

(via Visiting the Island of Utila)

Utila feels lost in a tropical time warp. Listening to the broad, almost incomprehensible Caribbean English coming out of islanders with names like Morgan and Bodden, it seems pirates ran amok here just a few years back instead of three centuries ago. Life on Utila still moves at a sedate pace; local conversation (imbued with an island lilt) is dominated by the weather, the state of the fishing industry, and spicy gossip about the affairs of the 2,800 or so inhabitants.

In the past couple of decades, Utila has gradually come face to face with the modern day. A steadily growing stream of budget travelers flow in from across the globe, all eager to get scuba certification for as little money as possible (about US$300 in early 2012, including dorm-style accommodations) and to enjoy the balmy Caribbean waters and famed reef. With its semiofficial designation as the low-budget Bay Island, Utila has become one of those backpacker hot spots like Zipolite or Lake Atitlán—packed with young Europeans and Americans out for a good time in the sun. Utila is also well known among sea-life enthusiasts as one of the best places in the world to see the whale shark, the largest fish in the world. These monstrous creatures, getting as big as 15 meters, frequent the Cayman Channel right off Utila and can be spotted (with much patience and a good captain) frequently throughout the year, and particularly in April, May, August, and September.

Read more.

Photo © Keith Levit/123rf.